U-M Launches New Multidisciplinary Institute with $55M Investment to Accelerate Quantum Research and Education

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About the Quantum Research Institute

The University of Michigan has announced a $55 million investment to launch a Quantum Research Institute (QRI) in order to address global quantum challenges and prepare a new generation of researchers to drive groundbreaking discoveries. The QRI is a joint venture among the Office of the Vice President for Research, the College of Engineering, and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. With support from the Office of the Provost, the institute aims to strengthen research collaborations among U-M faculty, industry partners, and government agencies.

To accomplish this goal, the QRI will recruit up to eight new faculty members with expertise in quantum, who will work closely with 20 U-M faculty fellows to identify and implement a strategic plan for bolstering quantum research across disciplines. The institute will also operate a research incubator designed to provide faculty with resources and services, including seed funding, to enable them to compete for large-scale external grants that advance bold research ideas.

Beyond its research mission, the institute plans to expand academic curricula to incorporate new courses that help prepare students for the future quantum workforce. Through QRI fellowships, U-M aims to recruit talented and diverse graduate students and postdoctoral research fellows to collaborate with faculty on multidisciplinary research projects.

With advancements in quantum engineering and technology revolutionizing the way the world operates, the QRI seeks to introduce quantum computers that operate a million times faster, quantum internet to distribute information more securely, and quantum engineering approaches that yield sustainability innovations such as carbon capture and energy harvesting. By strengthening research collaborations and preparing a new generation of quantum researchers, the QRI aims to help enhance national security, drive economic growth, and reinforce the United States’ position as a global leader in quantum engineering, science, and technology.

To solve global quantum challenges and prepare a next-generation workforce to catalyze new discoveries, the University of Michigan will invest $55 million to launch a multidisciplinary Quantum Research Institute.
Quantum Research Institute Co-Directors, Steven Cundiff (left) and Mack Kira (right)
"Quantum science and technology will remain a key national research priority for many years to come, and through this new institute, the University of Michigan has a tremendous opportunity to leverage its breadth of expertise to accelerate and translate quantum knowledge and discoveries for the benefit of society." Rebecca Cunningham Vice President for Research
“Through this cross-college collaboration, the University of Michigan can continue to lead in this cutting-edge research space, building on our long history of research excellence in photonics, quantum theory, as well as quantum materials.” -Anne Curzan, Dean, College of Literature, Science and the Arts

Events

Winter 2024 Seminar Series

Building a Quantum World with Trapped Ions

Dr. Harry Levine, Assistant Professor of Physics at the Duke Quantum Center (DQC)

February 22, 11:00 am – noon
Pierpont Commons
Boulevard Room (1st Floor)


This talk will describe the development of an atomic physics experiment into a quantum computer and quantum simulator. Our system is based on a chain of 171Yb+ ions with individual laser beam addressing. This fully connected device can be configured to run any sequence of single- and two-qubit gates, making it in effect an arbitrarily programmable quantum computer. The high degree of control can be used for digital quantum circuits, but also for analog and hybrid quantum simulations, including quantum-classical optimization routines. We operate this machine in user-facility mode, working with many external collaborators and growing its capabilities with every new application. I will present recent results from a lattice gauge theory simulation. Finally, I will describe our effort towards networking ion trap quantum computers in a city-sized network for new quantum technology applications. 

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Novel strategies for hardware-efficient quantum processors

Dr. Harry Levine, Research Scientist at the AWS Center for Quantum Computing of Physics
February 12, 2:00 pm – 3 pmEvent Graphic including speaker headshot and text describing the event
West Hall, Room 340 (3rd floor)
Zoom option
Quantum error correction is an exciting scientific frontier at the interface of many fields including quantum information science, many-body physics, and computer science. The field has developed rapidly in the last several years, with major milestones marking the first glimpses into a future of error-corrected quantum computers. At the same time, these advances have also illuminated the major science and engineering challenges that remain on the road to useful fault-tolerant quantum computers due to large resource overheads and demanding performance and control requirements. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in strategies to ease the demands of error correction with a focus on two leading quantum information platforms: superconducting circuits and cold atoms. First, I will discuss the paradigm of “erasure qubits” which are qubits for which errors can be flagged in real-time and are consequently easier to correct. In this context, I will discuss recent experiments showing how erasure qubits can be realized using a “dual-rail” encoding in superconducting transmons, offering a way to package standard qubit components into better error correction building blocks. Second, I will discuss the recent, rapid progress in neutral atom quantum computers and highlight how the unique capabilities for efficient and flexible control can ease the path towards scalable operation of error-corrected quantum processors.
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Entangling spins via local interactions for quantum-enhanced sensing and simulation

Dr. Shankari Rajagopal, Science Fellow at Stanford University
February 9, 1:50 pm – 3 pm
West Hall, Room 340 (3rd floor)
 

Quantum sensors hold promise for improved sensing of time, electromagnetic fields, and forces; however, the inherent probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics introduces uncertainty that can limit sensor precision. We can hope to overcome this uncertainty by engineering entanglement — in other words, by creating correlated behavior — in atomic systems. Unfortunately, in practice, introducing and controlling these correlations is limited by the local nature of interactions on many promising sensing platforms, including optical tweezer clocks and solid-state magnetometers. In this talk, I will discuss how we can use temporal control over local Rydberg interactions to extend interaction coherence times and minimize atomic loss in an array of atomic ensembles. With these improvements, we generate metrologically useful entanglement across several spatially separated ensembles in parallel [1]. This work demonstrates both the potential of local interactions to enhance the precision of optical clocks, and the power of spatiotemporal control to enhance and expand the capabilities of atomic systems.
[1] J.A. Hines, S.V. Rajagopal, G.L. Moreau, M.D. Wahrman, N.A. Lewis, O. Marković, and M. Schleier-Smith. Phys. Rev. Lett. 131, 063401 (2023).

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Quantum photonics with rare-earth atoms in solids

Dr. Elizabeth Goldschmidt, Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

February 8, 11 am – 12 pmtext: University of Michigan Quantum Research Institute Winter 2024 Seminar Series Quantum Photonics with Rare-Earth Atoms in Solids Elizabeth Goldschmidt Assistant Professor of Physics University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign February 8, 2024 11 am to noon Michigan League Henderson Room Light refreshments served Zoom option available research.umich.edu/quantum
Henderson Room (3rd floor) at the Michigan League
Zoom option 

Optically active and highly coherent emitters in solids are a promising platform for a wide variety of quantum information applications, particularly quantum memory and other quantum networking tasks. Rare-earth atoms, in addition to having record long coherence times, have the added benefit that they can be hosted in a wide range of solid-state materials. We can thus target particular materials (and choose particular rare-earth species and isotopes) that enable certain application-specific functionalities. I will give an overview of this promising field and discuss several ongoing projects with rare-earth atoms in different host materials and configurations. This includes efforts to identify and grow new materials with rare-earth atoms at stoichiometric concentrations in order to reduce disorder-induced inhomogeneous broadening, as well as photonic integration of rare-earth doped samples to increase the light-atom interaction for practical quantum devices.

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Nanoscale electron paramagnetic resonance and quantum opto-mechanics with diamond spin qubitsUniversity of Michigan Quantum Research InstituteWinter 2024 Seminar SeriesNanoscale Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Quantum Opto-Mechanics with Diamond Spin Qubits Gurudev Dutt Associate Professor of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of PittsburgJanuary 25, 202411 a.m. - Noon Pierpont CommonsBoulevard RoomLight refreshments servedZoom option availableAdd to Calendar QR coderesearch.umich.edu/quantum

January 25, 11 am

Pierpont Commons, Boulevard Room (1st Floor Mazznine)

Gurudev Dutt, Associate Professor at the University of Pittsburgh, will be presenting “Nanoscale electron paramagnetic resonance and quantum opto-mechanics with diamond spin qubits” as part of the Quantum Research Institute’s winter seminar series. Zoom option is also provided.

Seminar Description:

Single spins associated with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond have emerged as a promising and versatile experimental platform for quantum information processing. They can be used as nodes in optically connected quantum networks, as sensors for magnetic imaging with sub-micron resolution, for detecting and engineering quantum states of nano-mechanical oscillators, and even as probes in biological systems. Our group has demonstrated improvements to dynamic range and sensitivity of magnetometry using phase estimation algorithms, and carried out electron paramagnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single Cu ions on the diamond surface. I will also discuss a unique system in our lab where we magnetically trap and laser cool diamond microcrystals under high-vacuum room-temperature conditions for the first time, and discuss the path forward to observing quantum superpositions of macroscopically separated motional states.

Fall 2023 Seminar Series

Quantum Research Institute University of Michigan Fall 2023 Seminar Series Quantum-Enhanced Interferometric Imaging: A Step toward Quantum-Enhanced very-long-Baseline Interferometry for Astronomy Brian Smith, Professor Physics, OMQ Director University of Oregon November 30, 2023 11 a.m. - Noon Michigan League Hussey Room Light refreshments served Zoom option available Add to calendar QR code research.umich.edu/quantum

Quantum-enhanced interferometric imaging: A step toward quantum-enhanced very-long-baseline interferometry for astronomy – 11/30/23

Dr. Brian Smith, Professor of Physics at the University of Oregon, will be presenting “Quantum-enhanced interferometric imaging: A step toward quantum-enhanced very-long-baseline interferometry for astronomy” as part of the Quantum Research Institute’s fall seminar series from 11am – noon in the Hussey Room (2nd floor) at the Michigan League on Thursday, November 30th. A Zoom option is also provided.

Seminar Description:
We report a laboratory demonstration of interferometric imaging using a path-entangled single-photon state as a reference field distributed to spatially separated receivers to measure the spatial distribution of an extended incoherent source. The use of distributed entanglement between the receiving stations in this protocol allows measurements without requiring direct interference of the collected light and provides a route to larger baseline separations that could enhance the precision of astronomical telescopes.

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Phononic Bath Engineering of a Superconducting Qubit – 11/16/23text: Quantum Research Institute, University of Michigan Fall 2023 Seminar Series Phononic Bath Engineering of a Superconducting Qubit Johannes Pollanen, Associate Professor, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Michigan State University November 16, 2023 11 a.m. - Noon Pierpont Commons Boulevard Room Light refreshments served Zoom option available research.umich.edu/quantum

Dr. Johannes Pollanen, Associate Professor in the department of Physics and Astronomy at Michigan State University, will be presenting “Phononic Bath Engineering of a Superconducting Qubit” as part of the Quantum Research Institute’s fall seminar series from 11am – noon in the Boulevard Room (1st mezzanine floor) at Pierpont Commons on Thursday, November 16th. A Zoom option is also provided.

Seminar Description:
Interactions between a quantum system and its environment typically lead to unwanted decoherence and dissipation. However, if the environmental degrees of freedom can be sufficiently well understood, or even engineered, dissipation can be harnessed for the preparation and manipulation of such open quantum systems. In this talk I will discuss our recent results investigating a novel open quantum system composed of a superconducting transmon qubit coupled to surface piezophonon devices. In this hybrid quantum system we are able to engineer dissipation in the form of tailor-made phononic loss to control quantum information states of the qubit.

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Emerging Materials for Quantum Technologies – 11/2/2023

Quantum Research Institute, University of Michigan Fall 2023 Seminar Series, Emerging Materials for Quantum Technologies Yong Chen Karl Lark-Horovitz Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University November 02, 2023 11 a.m. - Noon Michigan League Kalamazoo Room Light refreshments served Zoom option available research.umich.edu/quantumDr. Yong P. Chen, Karl Lark-Horovitz Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Purdue and Director of the Purdue Quantum Science and Engineering Institute, will be presenting “Emerging Materials for Quantum Technologies” as part of the Quantum Research Institute’s fall seminar series from 11am – noon in the Kalamazoo Room (2nd floor) at the Michigan League on Thursday, November 2nd. A Zoom option is also provided.

Seminar Description:
This seminar will discuss some emerging materials — particularly in the space of 2D/layered and topological materials ranging from 2D semiconductors to topological insulators — and their promising properties and potential uses in quantum technologies.

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Quantum Research Institute seminar on 10/19: Linran FanQuantum Research Institute - University of Michigan Fall 2023 Seminar Series Hybrid Integrated Photonics for Quantum Information Processing Linran Fan Assistant Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Texas at Austin October 19, 2023 11 a.m. - Noon Pierpont Commons Boulevard Room Light refreshments served or via Zoom: https://myumi.ch/Nk4EP research.umich.edu/quantum

The third event in the Quantum Research Institute’s Fall 2023 seminar series will be from Dr. Linran Fan, Assistant Professor in the Chandra Family Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin.

Dr. Fan’s talk, titled “Hybrid Integrated Photonics for Quantum Information Processing” will take place on Thursday, Oct 19th from 11am – noon in the Boulevard Room (1st floor mezzanine) at Pierpont Commons. A Zoom option is also provided.

Seminar Description:
Photonics will play a central role in future quantum technology, offering the unique and indispensable capability to conserve quantum coherence over long distances and inter-connect different quantum systems. This talk will present our efforts in developing hybrid integrated photonic platforms, which enable the exploration of new quantum phenomena, the development of novel quantum information functions, and the improvement of quantum device performance.

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Quantum Research Institute seminar on 10/5: Amit Agrawal

Quantum Research Institute University of Michigan Fall 2023 Seminar Series Integrated Optical Control of Atomic Quantum Systems Amit Agrawal Project Leader Ultrafast Nano-Optics Group Physical Measurement Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology October 5, 2023 11 a.m. - Noon Michigan League Kalamazoo Room Light refreshments served or via Zoom: https://myumi.ch/Mr2J3 RESEARCH.UMICH.EDU/QUANTUM

The second event in the Quantum Research Institute’s Fall 2023 seminar series will be from Dr. Amit Agrawal, project leader of the Ultrafast Nano-Optics Group within the Physical Measurement Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Dr. Agrawal’s talk, titled ” Integrated Optical Control of Atomic Quantum Systems” will take place on Thursday, Oct 5th from 11am – noon in the Kalamazoo Room (2nd  floor) at the Michigan League. A Zoom option is also provided.

Seminar Description:
Optical control of quantum matter – from trapped atoms and ions to quantum dots and defects, is foundational for quantum information science and technology. Development of integrated photonics opens the possibility for realization of scalable circuits with complex functionalities, advancing both science and technology frontiers and enabling real-world applications in quantum sensing and precision measurements. Here, we present our work on scalable, robust and multifunctional nanophotonic interfaces to trap neutral atoms or address trapped ions. Our nanophotonic platform, replacing bulk optical elements, promises increased complexity and functionality in a batch-fabricated optical microsystem ultimately fully replacing the laboratory optical table to enable cold atom clocks and quantum computers.

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Quantum Research Institute Fall 2023 Seminar Series Co-Design Quantum Error Correction Liang Jiang, Professor, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering University of Chicago September 21, 2023 11 a.m. - Noon Pierpont Commons Bouelevard Room Light refreshments served Or via Zoom: https://myumi.ch/byxzX research.umich.edu/quantumCo-Designed Quantum Error Correction: Liang Jian – 9/21/23

Dr. Jiang’s talk, titled “Co-Designed Quantum Error Correction” will take place on Thursday, Sept 21st from 11am – noon in the Boulevard Room (1st floor) at Pierpont Commons (North Campus). A Zoom option is also provided.

Seminar Description:

Our goal is to design quantum error correction schemes that suppress hardware-specific errors while meeting diverse application needs. This presentation covers the design of error-correcting codes that effectively handle practical errors, including custom schemes for AMO and solid-state platforms, as well as applications in quantum computing, communication, and sensing.

Contact Us

Email the Quantum Research Institute: quantum-info@umich.edu